The Math Phobia

Posted by Hunee | 10/19/2011 05:39:00 PM | 0 comments »

Math anxiety or fear of math is actually quite common. Math anxiety is quite similar to stagefright. Why does someone suffer stagefright? Fear of something going wrong in front of a crowd? Fear of forgetting the lines? Fear of being judged poorly? Fear of going completely blank? Math anxiety conjures up fear of some type—the fear that one won't be able to do the math or the fear that it's too hard or the fear of failure which often stems from having a lack of confidence.

For the most part, math anxiety is the fear about doing the math right, our minds draw a blank and we think we'll fail and of course the more frustrated and anxious our minds become, the greater the chance for drawing blanks. Added pressure of having time limits on math tests and exams also cause the levels of anxiety grow for many students.

Usually math anxiety stems from unpleasant experiences in mathematics. Typically math phobics have had math presented in such a fashion that it led to limited understanding. Unfortunately, math anxiety is often due to poor teaching and poor experiences in math which typically leads to math anxiety. Many tudents have demonstrated an over reliance on procedures in math as opposed to actually understanding the math.

When one tries to memorize procedures, rules and routines without much understanding, the math is quickly forgotten and panic soons sets in. Think about your experiences with one concept—the division of fractions. You probably learned about reciprocals and inverses. In other words, 'It's not yours to reason why, just invert and multiply'. Well, you memorized the rule and it works. Why does it work? Do you really understand why it works? Did anyone every use pizzas or math manipulatives to show you why it works? If not, you simply memorized the procedure and that was that.

But your math phobia can be resolved with just two words: mental arithmetic. Mental arithmetic is designed to improve not only your calculating ability and understanding of arithmetic. It also increases your memory power and creativity, concentration level and listening skill, as well as the ability to analyze problem. On top of loving math for lifelong success, the ultimate goal of mental arithmetic is to build your confidence level in your school work and life.

For students to overcome their math phobia, they need to develop their abilities in calculation. Learning mental arithmetic can quickly enhance their competency in calculation. There are various mental arithmetic programs in Asia, especially in Singapore where most schools offer mental arithmetic courses. There are also various sites online that gives trainings and modules on mental arithmetic.

  @box @dropbox @dropshots @expono @evernote @facebook @flickr @fotki @friendfeed @gdocs @hi5 @hyves @identi @imageshack @jaiku @kewego @kodak @linkedin @lj @moby @myspace @orkut @photobucket @picasa @plaxo @plerb @plurk @shutterfly @smugmug @snapfish @sonico @soundcloud @sugarsync @tinypic @tumblr @twitpic @wordpress @yahoo @yfrog @youtube @zooomr

The Math Phobia

Math anxiety or fear of math is actually quite common. Math anxiety is quite similar to stagefright. Why does someone suffer stagefright? Fear of something going wrong in front of a crowd? Fear of forgetting the lines? Fear of being judged poorly? Fear of going completely blank? Math anxiety conjures up fear of some type—the fear that one won't be able to do the math or the fear that it's too hard or the fear of failure which often stems from having a lack of confidence.

For the most part, math anxiety is the fear about doing the math right, our minds draw a blank and we think we'll fail and of course the more frustrated and anxious our minds become, the greater the chance for drawing blanks. Added pressure of having time limits on math tests and exams also cause the levels of anxiety grow for many students.

Usually math anxiety stems from unpleasant experiences in mathematics. Typically math phobics have had math presented in such a fashion that it led to limited understanding. Unfortunately, math anxiety is often due to poor teaching and poor experiences in math which typically leads to math anxiety. Many tudents have demonstrated an over reliance on procedures in math as opposed to actually understanding the math.

When one tries to memorize procedures, rules and routines without much understanding, the math is quickly forgotten and panic soons sets in. Think about your experiences with one concept—the division of fractions. You probably learned about reciprocals and inverses. In other words, 'It's not yours to reason why, just invert and multiply'. Well, you memorized the rule and it works. Why does it work? Do you really understand why it works? Did anyone every use pizzas or math manipulatives to show you why it works? If not, you simply memorized the procedure and that was that.

But your math phobia can be resolved with just two words: mental arithmetic. Mental arithmetic is designed to improve not only your calculating ability and understanding of arithmetic. It also increases your memory power and creativity, concentration level and listening skill, as well as the ability to analyze problem. On top of loving math for lifelong success, the ultimate goal of mental arithmetic is to build your confidence level in your school work and life.

For students to overcome their math phobia, they need to develop their abilities in calculation. Learning mental arithmetic can quickly enhance their competency in calculation. There are various mental arithmetic programs in Asia, especially in Singapore where most schools offer mental arithmetic courses. There are also various sites online that gives trainings and modules on mental arithmetic.

  @box @dropbox @dropshots @expono @evernote @facebook @flickr @fotki @friendfeed @gdocs @hi5 @hyves @identi @imageshack @jaiku @kewego @kodak @linkedin @lj @moby @myspace @orkut @photobucket @picasa @plaxo @plerb @plurk @shutterfly @smugmug @snapfish @sonico @soundcloud @sugarsync @tinypic @tumblr @twitpic @wordpress @yahoo @yfrog @youtube @zooomr

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