What is Mental Arithmetic? A Guide for Parents

Posted by Hunee | 10/13/2011 05:05:00 PM | 0 comments »

Is mental arithmetic for kids really important?

A lot of kids have grown accustomed to the common attitude towards mathematics: hating it. Yes, no matter where you are or what your kids' age is, chances are, they aren't a fan of their math subjects.

But the fact remains that mathematics is task (or burden) that we deal with every single day.

As we grow older, we realize and more how important good math skills are. And even if we aren't required to, a lot of people are studying math even as adults because their jobs depend on it.

So why not spare your children with late math lessons by introducing mental arithmetic as early as possible?

The University of Missouri recently published a research about the importance of learning and developing great math skills as kids. It was published in July 2011 and it suggested that kids who were good in math in their first grade of school had the easiest and most success in their first algebra class! This means that the earlier your child develops a clear and concrete understanding of math concepts, the easier everything else would be for them.

In the study, it was found that as soon as a child starts falling behind his math classes, it is almost impossible for them get back on track.

As you can see, it is so important to create a good math foundation for kids- this can help them in their future in school and even in the workplace.

Mental arithmetic for children is also not as complicated as it sounds. In fact, the earlier a child studies mental arithmetic, the easier it will be for them to really understand the different techniques and concepts behind it.

This is because of the fact that the younger a person is, the more "un-exposed" they are to the traditional way of learning or teaching. Most school systems teach math the wrong way- rigid and lesson-plan based. With mental arithmetic, there is a deeper focus on learning, understanding and mastering the basics before going on to other topics.

Mental arithmetic for kids is also very effective because it is presented in an interesting and fun manner. Most kids are "programmed" to hate math but once they see that arithmetic is fun, they would be more interested in learning it.

Besides, mental arithmetic involves a lot of tricks and games- two things every kids wants.

Mental arithmetic can be a lot to process for parents. But it's a great way to equip kids with the right skills and knowledge to excel in math and other subjects as well.

If you are unsure about the effectiveness or necessity of mental arithmetic, I hope that I have given you a better overview of how mental arithmetic can help your children. @box @dropbox @dropshots @expono @evernote @facebook @flickr @fotki @friendfeed @gdocs @hi5 @hyves @identi @imageshack @jaiku @kewego @kodak @linkedin @lj @moby @myspace @orkut @photobucket @picasa @plaxo @plerb @plurk @shutterfly @smugmug @snapfish @sonico @soundcloud @sugarsync @tinypic @tumblr @twitpic @wordpress @yahoo @yfrog @youtube @zooomr

What is Mental Arithmetic? A Guide for Parents

Is mental arithmetic for kids really important?

A lot of kids have grown accustomed to the common attitude towards mathematics: hating it. Yes, no matter where you are or what your kids' age is, chances are, they aren't a fan of their math subjects.

But the fact remains that mathematics is task (or burden) that we deal with every single day.

As we grow older, we realize and more how important good math skills are. And even if we aren't required to, a lot of people are studying math even as adults because their jobs depend on it.

So why not spare your children with late math lessons by introducing mental arithmetic as early as possible?

The University of Missouri recently published a research about the importance of learning and developing great math skills as kids. It was published in July 2011 and it suggested that kids who were good in math in their first grade of school had the easiest and most success in their first algebra class! This means that the earlier your child develops a clear and concrete understanding of math concepts, the easier everything else would be for them.

In the study, it was found that as soon as a child starts falling behind his math classes, it is almost impossible for them get back on track.

As you can see, it is so important to create a good math foundation for kids- this can help them in their future in school and even in the workplace.

Mental arithmetic for children is also not as complicated as it sounds. In fact, the earlier a child studies mental arithmetic, the easier it will be for them to really understand the different techniques and concepts behind it.

This is because of the fact that the younger a person is, the more "un-exposed" they are to the traditional way of learning or teaching. Most school systems teach math the wrong way- rigid and lesson-plan based. With mental arithmetic, there is a deeper focus on learning, understanding and mastering the basics before going on to other topics.

Mental arithmetic for kids is also very effective because it is presented in an interesting and fun manner. Most kids are "programmed" to hate math but once they see that arithmetic is fun, they would be more interested in learning it.

Besides, mental arithmetic involves a lot of tricks and games- two things every kids wants.

Mental arithmetic can be a lot to process for parents. But it's a great way to equip kids with the right skills and knowledge to excel in math and other subjects as well.

If you are unsure about the effectiveness or necessity of mental arithmetic, I hope that I have given you a better overview of how mental arithmetic can help your children. @box @dropbox @dropshots @expono @evernote @facebook @flickr @fotki @friendfeed @gdocs @hi5 @hyves @identi @imageshack @jaiku @kewego @kodak @linkedin @lj @moby @myspace @orkut @photobucket @picasa @plaxo @plerb @plurk @shutterfly @smugmug @snapfish @sonico @soundcloud @sugarsync @tinypic @tumblr @twitpic @wordpress @yahoo @yfrog @youtube @zooomr

0 comments